• Our city. Our legacy. Our forest park.
    Te takiwā, kā hua a Tāne, he taoka tuku iho.
  • Our city. Our legacy. Our forest park.
    Te takiwā, kā hua a Tāne, he taoka tuku iho.
  • Our city. Our legacy. Our forest park.
    Te takiwā, kā hua a Tāne, he taoka tuku iho.
  • Our city. Our legacy. Our forest park.
    Te takiwā, kā hua a Tāne, he taoka tuku iho.

Red zone regeneration hotspot

Nestled at the back of a River Rd, Richmond, section is a 300sq m oasis of biodiversity, that gives a glimpse into the future of Avon-Otakaro Forest Park.

The owners planted native trees over 50 years ago, in an area that would once have supported kahikatea bush. Today the trees stand tall and are among the oldest native plants in the Avon River Red Zone.

Among the taller trees are red and black beechkowhai, young kauritotara, young mataicabbage treeslancewoodsfive finger, kahikatea and several types of pittosporum. The smaller plants include hoheriacorokiawineberrybush daisieskarakaporoporowind grass and several species of flax and hebe. And on the floor of this small forest hoheria and several types of kowhai seedlings are growing.

Fantail in regenerating native bush in the Christchurch red zone
Fantail, piwakawaka, in the Avon River red zone
Regeneration of native forest species is already providing habitat for birds such as fantails in the Avon River red zone

Our native animals love it, with fantailskereru, and red admiral butterflies all making themselves at home.

Volunteer working bees have focused on weeding out invasive exotics such as convolvulus and wandering willy – a plant that was smothering the ground, preventing native regeneration.

The volunteers are helping nature get on with the job of regeneration here – and the birds that take the seed from this site are spreading it throughout the Avon River Red Zone.

On the next page: Save money by taking nature's lead